Category Archives: Interview Skills

Healthcare Cover Letters: Why They’re Important

A cover letter is just as important as your resume. As a candidate, you are introducing yourself to the employer and letting them know why you should be considered for the position. This week we are focusing on how to write a great cover letter that will impress any employer.

First, you must evaluate what you should write in your cover letter. A cover letter is not the same as your resume; it gives the employer the opportunity to understand how your previous work and education have made you the right fit for their job. A cover letter does not need to be lengthy, but it must be clear and concise. Here are some steps to remember when writing your cover letter:

1) Express your understanding of the field and how your previous schooling and employment have prepared you for this position.

2) Explain why you are interested in this employer and your reason for desiring work in the healthcare field.

3) Give relevant school work and experience as an example, but don’t reiterate your entire resume.

4) Proofread your cover letter. Proofreading a cover letter is just as important as proofreading a resume. Check for grammatical and spelling errors.

Remember, a great cover letter and resume will help you get the job of your dreams!

Tips for Working with a Recruiter

SpineSearch wants all of our candidates to have the best chance of finding a job they love. As a candidate, working with a recruiter can really improve your chances of getting the right job. Candidates want to look for a recruiter that specializes in their field; this ensures that you will only be getting calls about jobs that pertain to your line of work.

The candidate should also be aware that the recruiter’s work is to find the right fit for the employer. Even though you interview for the job, it does not mean that you will get the job. Still, you want to interview for any position that interests you. Just because one employer does not think you are the right fit for the job, does not mean that every employer will think that.

You should have goals for yourself but be flexible. Don’t apply to jobs that are asking for experience you don’t have. You may go on a lot of interviews, but this will be crucial towards you finding a job. Candidates should also be honest and accessible with their recruiter. You should put your best foot forward while looking for a new job.

The most important thing to remember is: don’t get lazy. The recruiter wants to help you find work, but it is not their responsibility to do all of the work for you. When you go on interviews the recruiter won’t be there to make sure you brought your resume or wore an appropriate outfit. You must use the recruiter as a middle man between you and the employer. At SpineSearch we pre-screen all of our candidates before sending them to the employer. Candidates are able to get a good sense of what the employer is looking for, and the recruiter can give feedback to the employer about the candidate.

Resume Writing:Do’s and Don’ts

Resume writing can be quite simple if you have established the basics well, but if you haven’t caught up on the newest ways to improve your resume then SpineSearch is here to help! As a healthcare professional, writing a resume means including all of your clinical experience as well as license and certification. To improve your resume writing skills, here are some Do’s and Don’ts to make your resume stand out among the other applicants:

Do’s

1) Make your resume simple

This doesn’t mean you shouldn’t put a lot of effort into your resume it means you should write short, concise sentences that have a clear purpose and direction for your resume. You want the employer to get the most positive idea of your work history.

2) Proofread your resume more than once

You can proofread your resume and have a colleague proofread it for you too. Resumes get overlooked when an employer finds spelling errors in them. Edit your resume after every proofread.

3) Use buzzwords

A lot of practices are now using technology to scan in resumes and check for certain buzzwords and resumes that don’t have them will not be submitted for the job. Describe work history/accomplishments using the proper phrasing to ensure your resume won’t be overlooked. An example of this would be using words like: caseload, computer tech/skills, research/publications, responsible for, participated in etc.

Don’ts

1)      Don’t use the word “I”

Avoid using “I” in your resume. Instead describe your actions by using some of the buzzwords listed above.

2)      Don’t make your resume over two pages

Resume length has been debated but various professionals, but it is safe to say that a resume over two pages will become too much for a potential employer to read and they may wind up tossing you out as a candidate.

3)      Don’t include personal information

An employer does not need to know your marital status, height, weight etc. because that is not pertinent to you getting the job. Use the space you have on your resume wisely.

4)      Don’t write: “references available upon request”

This will only take up space and since you are giving an employer your resume it’s implied that you would give references if he/she asked for them.

5)      Don’t change tenses

For your current job you should use the present tense when describing your job duties, and for previous jobs you should use the past tense, but you shouldn’t go back and forth between present and past tense for every action you are describing.

6)      Don’t change fonts

You should pick a font that is easy to read and stick with it throughout the whole resume. Changing fonts will become distracting to the employer’s eye.

These steps will help you write a resume that will impress any employer.

Compensate for Talent with Effort: New Graduates

As a new grad you probably feel like you’re outnumbered by candidates who have experience. SpineSearch wants to help you see that making an effort for a new job will impress the employer you are interviewing with. Employers usually want people with some experience, but as a new grad you have your schooling, clinical rotations, and internships to fall back on. Don’t let the employer underestimate you.

Enthusiasm will be your biggest and best advantage over other applicants. You want to show the employer that you chose this profession for a reason—you love it. Showing that you care and how excited you are to work in this field will make an employer think twice before counting you out.
You want to be as prepared as possible for your interview; research the practice or hospital you are looking to apply to, what they specialize in, and if they are right for your line of work.

Sending a “Thank You” card or email (which is much more common these days) goes a long way when interviewing right out of college. The employer appreciates it and will set you apart from candidates who didn’t go the extra mile. The thank you can also act as a follow-up and remind the employer who you are and they will be much more likely to get back to you with a yes or no sooner rather than later.

Compensating for your lack of experience with effort will go much further than an experienced candidate who has become apathetic about the field. If you show up and want to be there, you will learn volumes and be ahead of the pack before you know it.

Make the Most of Your Summer Job Hunt

SpineSearch wants all of its candidates to not give up on their job hunt. In order to do this candidates must keep in mind that just because they’re going on vacation for a week or two does not mean that employers stop looking for people to hire. Don’t fall victim to the lazy days of summer; SpineSearch wants to help you succeed at your next job interview. Here are some reminders to help you during your summer job hunt:
1) Ask Questions During the Interview
You should always do your research on a company before you go on an interview, and when an employer asks you if you have any questions don’t come up empty handed. Ask questions about the culture in the office and if there is a sense of community. Ask the employer well-thought questions that show you care about the company and what your role would be there.
2) Don’t Use an Inappropriate Email Address
If you have to question whether or not your email is appropriate, then it probably isn’t fit for your resume. You can easily make an email address that is specifically for your resume; make it simple and suitable for a potential employer to see.
3) Have Concrete Examples of Prior Work
When an employer asks you about a time when you solved a problem or took a leadership role at your last job, you should be able to site clear examples without hesitation. If you hesitate for too long the employer could think you are making the story up. Before you go on a job interview think about what potential questions an employer might ask and rehearse them with someone.
4) Improve Your Resume
Summer is the perfect time to refresh your resume; SpineSearch offers exclusive help to their candidates to create a resume that will impress any employer. Your Resume should represent a well-organized example of your work history.

How Body Language Plays a Key Role in an Interview

Candidates often do not think about how their non-verbal communication during an interview could put them at a disadvantage. Subconsciously we are all aware of what body language makes us feel comfortable with a person or sends us the wrong message. This explains one reason why employers choose one candidate over another. In order to better understand why body language is so important in an interview, a candidate has to understand what signals are sending the wrong message. Here are three body language mistakes many people make during an interview:
1) Slouching in a chair
This could be a huge red flag to an employer, because it signifies that you are disinterested in what he or she is saying.
2) Fidgeting
Whether you’re twirling your hair or cracking your knuckles, fidgeting shows that you are nervous and uncomfortable and that signifies to the employer that you might not be the right fit for the position you are applying for.
3) Shifty eyes
If you are in an interview and have your eyes darting all over the room it signifies that you either have something to hide and you can’t be trusted. Obviously, no person wants to come across this way in an interview. A potential employer wants you to make genuine eye contact, not staring them down, showing that you are actively engaged in the conversation.
If you become more aware of what your body language is saying then you will be even more prepared for your next interview.
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