Tag Archives: medical recruitment

Creating the Correct Environment for Medical Staff Retention

Healthcare workers are in high demand and this means healthcare organizations must create environments that encourage them to stay once they’re hired; easier said than done. Lack of advancement opportunities is one of the main reasons people working in healthcare leave jobs; recruiting and retaining healthcare workers depends on developing a nurturing environment where these professionals can thrive.

Most healthcare professionals are more likely to leave jobs when they are unhappy with the office culture or they feel like they can get more experience somewhere else. You have to create reasons for them to stay. Some options include, but are not limited to: In-house skills training, technology training, performance-based incentives and sign-on bonus. Healthcare workers value these programs because they encourage professional development and upward career mobility for all medical staff. The experience they get from your practice should be invaluable to them over the course of their career. You will attract more highly qualified candidates if you are offering employees more than just a paycheck.

Office environments are underrated by most professionals. Medical practices tend to assume that if people are leaving jobs it has more to do with that person than with the structure of the practice. Some people might leave because the job just isn�t what they expected, but other people will leave because of what you aren�t offering them. Medical assistants, nurse practitioners, physicians and receptionists won’t stay if you are unable to offer the kind of atmosphere that ensures a safe, healthy and productive work environment.

Since healthcare changes and evolves your education and training for members of the staff cannot be static. EMR systems will be subject to change especially as the technology advances as well as processes for billing and coding. These changes will affect the entire staff and how you recruit for new candidates. Concurrently, urgent care facilities are becoming more prominent and hospital employment is looking more favorable for physicians; because of this, private practices are having trouble with retention. Instead of scrambling to replace people, look into what you are currently doing and how to make it better. Happy employees don�t go searching for new jobs.

The Importance of Properly Engaging Your Medical Staff

Once you’ve hired the staff for your medical practice you have to make sure that they are engaged in their jobs and day to day responsibilities. Some practices do not take the time to check in with employees and make sure they are interested and staying on task throughout the day. Every employee should feel like they are a valuable member of your team

The practice will be busy throughout the day leaving very little down time for employees so they need clearly defined roles from the onset of employment. Job responsibilities break down into two groups: clinical and non-clinical. Clinical staff should have a set of policies in place for them to follow and non-clinical staff should have their own set of policies as well. The office should run smoothly on a day to day basis. One of the best ways to engage employees is to ask key questions during the interview process to make sure they are going to be a good fit for the practice. The better you know your own practice, the better you will be at marketing it to prospective employees. Provide training for new employees to give them the skills they need to excel and increase value to the practice. Training for employees is highly appreciated and will give them a probationary period where they know they are learning the ins and outs of the practice.

During the interview process you can get a better feel for the type of employees you will be hiring by asking specific questions. Ask them about their accomplishments in their previous positions and the amount of time it took them to complete tasks. You should see if they prefer jobs where they were given a lot of responsibilities or more highly structured positions with more supervision. Employees who are engaged have greater commitment to the practice and they go above and beyond their basic job descriptions. Having weekly staff meetings will increase office morale and keep employees interested in their jobs.

Think of staff meetings as an investment; you want to keep your staff informed about what is going on in each department. Set up an agenda for the meeting in advance so everyone knows what topics you will be covering. Including them when it comes to decisions for the practice is another way to keep staff engaged. Maybe you�re thinking about switching to a new EMR system or about creating a practice website, discuss this with your staff so they can give feedback. Don’t just listen to their feedback; utilize it to better the practice. Be consistent with your communication; employees want to know that if a problem arises you will be able to take care of it in a timely and professional manner.

Keeping employees engaged starts with the hiring process and marketing your practice to the right people. Communicating effectively with clinical and non-clinical staff, scheduling regular team meetings are simple ways to make the office run more efficiently and give every member of your staff the opportunity to be successful.

Dealing With a Difficult Employee

Dealing With a Difficult Employee

Dealing with a difficult employee can be troublesome, especially when it affects the entire office. There are plenty solutions for this problem, but often people will ignore the problem for too long instead of facing it head on. Your business cannot afford to have an employee who is distracting others with their bad attitude. Fixing the issues will only help your office operate smoothly on a day to day basis.

There are many types of difficult employees ranging from disgruntled to insubordinate, but the common thread between all of them is negative behavior that has been effective for them in the past. If they got away with certain negative behaviors at a previous job chances are they will engage in those behaviors again. The behavior can be corrected if handled properly. Working with a difficult person can become a major irritant. Whether you work for a large company or a small business it can become a wearing struggle to go to work every day. Difficult people have a way of infiltrating the entire morale of the office and decrease productivity. It is very different to deal with people when they are not your direct co-worker or employee. Yes, everyone has dealt with a rude or nasty person over the phone, but that is fleeting, you can generally put it in perspective and move on from it. You can�t move on as easily when you are dealing with the person for 8, 10 or 12 hours a day.

The first step in dealing with a difficult employee: don’t ignore it. Ignoring the problem will only make it worse and in time you may lose valuable employees in the process. If the employee possesses valuable and redeeming qualities then there are ways to correct the behavior. Set aside a time to speak with the employee. Make sure you are open to hearing their point of view and try not to place blame. You will get a much more genuine response if you are not coming at the employee in an aggressive manner. Sometimes there may be factors outside of work that are causing the employee to act out. Although letting personal problems affect you at work is not ideal, it can be fixed. Let the employee know that although they may be having a tough time outside work it is not an excuse to take it out on others. Essentially you are giving the person a warning and a chance to correct the behavior. If the employee has issues with a co-worker you can attempt to mediate or switch the employees’ department, but if that does not work you must start seriously considering other options.

Terminating an employee is never easy but there are some situations where it is the best for you and the rest of the office. No matter how much you try some people are just too difficult to be helped. However, there ways to avoid terminating employees as a last resort; do not only have performance evaluations annually. Make the effort to have brief evaluations year round. Checking in with employees makes them feel important and like they are a priority; they should feel valued at work. Each person has different motivations, needs, and styles. Finding ways to capitalize on positive behaviors will decrease the likelihood of becoming inundated with negative behaviors.

Most of the time a difficult employee will try to turn the negative behavior around especially during tough economic times. Remember, making the negative behavior as ineffective as possible will help. Once a difficult employee recognizes that they cannot manipulate you or their co-workers with their behavior, they might attempt to change. In situations where they do not attempt to make changes you may decide to let the person go. Sometimes it is necessary to make tough decisions in order to succeed in the long-run.

Improving Medical Office Efficiency

In order for your medical practice to run at its optimal level, you must take the time to evaluate your current practice and fix what’s keeping you from having an efficient medical office space. First, start by evaluating your own productivity; make a list of tasks you perform every day and see what most of your daily efforts are going towards. Some tasks might be responsibilities only you can perform while others could be delegated and therefore your time could be better spent focused on other things. How you handle your workload greatly affects the rest of the office’s workflow. You must set the tone for how the office should operate. For instance, if you’re disorganized and run late with patients then your staff falls behind on their own work. Some staff members might even pick up on your bad habits and emulate them, making the office run ineffectively.

You should also take the time to hire qualified staff members, both clinical and non-clinical, to work for you. How the medical staff operates depends greatly on how well they can do the job you’ve hired them for. If you don’t feel like you have time to dedicate going through resumes, you can always hire a third party medical recruiting company to only send you qualified candidates and perform background checks.

Another way to help your medical practice is to have a system of employee evaluation in place. Allowing staff members to asses themselves and be evaluated by the physician or practice manager can help improve employee satisfaction and this will cross over into other areas of the practice. By fixing small problems, committing to timeliness, and planning ahead your practice will only improve and become more efficient.

Do You Know if Patients Think Your Medical Practice is Friendly?

Most patients can probably recall a time that they felt overlooked or treated in a rude manner by staff at a medical practice. Yes, medical and non-medical staff are very busy throughout the day, but this does not mean patients deserve to feel like they are an annoyance. After all, patients are coming to your practice in need or treatment or diagnosis and they deserved to feel welcomes and cared for.

A good way to get a jump start on creating a patient friendly atmosphere is putting yourself in your patients’ shoes. Take a look around the office, is the waiting room welcoming? A lot of patients often feel intimated when they walk into a waiting room that has tons of signs posted stating co-pays need to be paid at the time of service or about being late for an appointment. Your office has policies for a reason, but posting a bunch of signs may not do the trick. Calling patients to confirm their appointments 24 hours beforehand and reminding them in a polite way about co-payments will actually produce much better results. Sure, there will always be some people who cancel last minute or forget the co-pay, but having a system in place for dealing with minor inconveniences like these will reduce the stress of the staff. You may even consider an opt in text message notification policy like many practices are using today.

If you don’t know something is wrong you can’t fix it – Always make sure the Doctors, Practice Managers, Nurse Practitioners & Physician Assistants ask patients; How has your visit been? How easy was it to schedule your appointment? Are you happy with our practice?…. Patients who are asked for their input feel appreciated. One of the biggest ways to create a welcoming atmosphere starts with good practice management. If the staff feels appreciated, then the office will run happily and efficiently. Having a happy medical staff that is also on top of their game will reduce patient wait time and create a great atmosphere for you, your staff and most of all your patients’.

Healthcare Cover Letters: Why They’re Important

A cover letter is just as important as your resume. As a candidate, you are introducing yourself to the employer and letting them know why you should be considered for the position. This week we are focusing on how to write a great cover letter that will impress any employer.

First, you must evaluate what you should write in your cover letter. A cover letter is not the same as your resume; it gives the employer the opportunity to understand how your previous work and education have made you the right fit for their job. A cover letter does not need to be lengthy, but it must be clear and concise. Here are some steps to remember when writing your cover letter:

1) Express your understanding of the field and how your previous schooling and employment have prepared you for this position.

2) Explain why you are interested in this employer and your reason for desiring work in the healthcare field.

3) Give relevant school work and experience as an example, but don’t reiterate your entire resume.

4) Proofread your cover letter. Proofreading a cover letter is just as important as proofreading a resume. Check for grammatical and spelling errors.

Remember, a great cover letter and resume will help you get the job of your dreams!

Tips for Working with a Recruiter

SpineSearch wants all of our candidates to have the best chance of finding a job they love. As a candidate, working with a recruiter can really improve your chances of getting the right job. Candidates want to look for a recruiter that specializes in their field; this ensures that you will only be getting calls about jobs that pertain to your line of work.

The candidate should also be aware that the recruiter’s work is to find the right fit for the employer. Even though you interview for the job, it does not mean that you will get the job. Still, you want to interview for any position that interests you. Just because one employer does not think you are the right fit for the job, does not mean that every employer will think that.

You should have goals for yourself but be flexible. Don’t apply to jobs that are asking for experience you don’t have. You may go on a lot of interviews, but this will be crucial towards you finding a job. Candidates should also be honest and accessible with their recruiter. You should put your best foot forward while looking for a new job.

The most important thing to remember is: don’t get lazy. The recruiter wants to help you find work, but it is not their responsibility to do all of the work for you. When you go on interviews the recruiter won’t be there to make sure you brought your resume or wore an appropriate outfit. You must use the recruiter as a middle man between you and the employer. At SpineSearch we pre-screen all of our candidates before sending them to the employer. Candidates are able to get a good sense of what the employer is looking for, and the recruiter can give feedback to the employer about the candidate.

Resume Writing:Do’s and Don’ts

Resume writing can be quite simple if you have established the basics well, but if you haven’t caught up on the newest ways to improve your resume then SpineSearch is here to help! As a healthcare professional, writing a resume means including all of your clinical experience as well as license and certification. To improve your resume writing skills, here are some Do’s and Don’ts to make your resume stand out among the other applicants:

Do’s

1) Make your resume simple

This doesn’t mean you shouldn’t put a lot of effort into your resume it means you should write short, concise sentences that have a clear purpose and direction for your resume. You want the employer to get the most positive idea of your work history.

2) Proofread your resume more than once

You can proofread your resume and have a colleague proofread it for you too. Resumes get overlooked when an employer finds spelling errors in them. Edit your resume after every proofread.

3) Use buzzwords

A lot of practices are now using technology to scan in resumes and check for certain buzzwords and resumes that don’t have them will not be submitted for the job. Describe work history/accomplishments using the proper phrasing to ensure your resume won’t be overlooked. An example of this would be using words like: caseload, computer tech/skills, research/publications, responsible for, participated in etc.

Don’ts

1)      Don’t use the word “I”

Avoid using “I” in your resume. Instead describe your actions by using some of the buzzwords listed above.

2)      Don’t make your resume over two pages

Resume length has been debated but various professionals, but it is safe to say that a resume over two pages will become too much for a potential employer to read and they may wind up tossing you out as a candidate.

3)      Don’t include personal information

An employer does not need to know your marital status, height, weight etc. because that is not pertinent to you getting the job. Use the space you have on your resume wisely.

4)      Don’t write: “references available upon request”

This will only take up space and since you are giving an employer your resume it’s implied that you would give references if he/she asked for them.

5)      Don’t change tenses

For your current job you should use the present tense when describing your job duties, and for previous jobs you should use the past tense, but you shouldn’t go back and forth between present and past tense for every action you are describing.

6)      Don’t change fonts

You should pick a font that is easy to read and stick with it throughout the whole resume. Changing fonts will become distracting to the employer’s eye.

These steps will help you write a resume that will impress any employer.

Compensate for Talent with Effort: New Graduates

As a new grad you probably feel like you’re outnumbered by candidates who have experience. SpineSearch wants to help you see that making an effort for a new job will impress the employer you are interviewing with. Employers usually want people with some experience, but as a new grad you have your schooling, clinical rotations, and internships to fall back on. Don’t let the employer underestimate you.

Enthusiasm will be your biggest and best advantage over other applicants. You want to show the employer that you chose this profession for a reason—you love it. Showing that you care and how excited you are to work in this field will make an employer think twice before counting you out.
You want to be as prepared as possible for your interview; research the practice or hospital you are looking to apply to, what they specialize in, and if they are right for your line of work.

Sending a “Thank You” card or email (which is much more common these days) goes a long way when interviewing right out of college. The employer appreciates it and will set you apart from candidates who didn’t go the extra mile. The thank you can also act as a follow-up and remind the employer who you are and they will be much more likely to get back to you with a yes or no sooner rather than later.

Compensating for your lack of experience with effort will go much further than an experienced candidate who has become apathetic about the field. If you show up and want to be there, you will learn volumes and be ahead of the pack before you know it.

Emotional Needs in the Workplace

Am I happy with my job? People ask themselves this all the time without putting too much stock into whether the answer is yes or no. However, if you are unhappy with your job this can affect job performance and overall self-esteem, and decrease your productivity at work. This week we’re focusing on how emotional needs have to be met in the workplace in order to create a positive work environment.

Emotional needs in the workplace are very important in contributing to an overall healthy work environment. If you feel like no one cares about you at work, then you are more likely not to work as hard or dread going to work.

Feeling like you belong at your job and with your coworkers goes a long way when furthering your career; motivation is everything. When you feel like you belong and that people understand and listen to you, you’re much more likely to be successful at work. Team building at work can help fulfill the sense of belonging and also relieve stress. When a person feels like they cannot turn to anyone at work they become unhappy in the workplace.

Being given more responsibilities at work helps create great self-worth. When your boss gives you more tasks and responsibility it shows how valuable you are to the team. You should always be looking for opportunities to grow within your field and gain more knowledge about your industry. It is important to gain recognition for a job well-done. If you do not get the credit for your hard work you will not feel valuable.
Happiness at work is an important factor for employees everywhere. Finding a field you love and wanting to further your career will give you lasting success. SpineSearch can help you find a job that makes you happy and successful!
Contact SpineSearch Today!