Tag Archives: physician recruitment

Scaling up a Surgical Practice

Adding more doctors to your practice might be a smart move for smaller practices. Yes, the added cost can be expensive but for most doctors it is well worth it. Smaller practices have struggled more and more recently. It is harder to keep doctors in smaller practices when the payoffs are not as big but the responsibilities are greater. You might be stuck deciding what path to take to grow your practice; here are four ways to scale up:
1) Satellite Offices
Scaling up the practices can occur a few different ways. One way would be opening satellite offices as a means to create more revenue and patient. Making the practice more accessible to patients will help you engage new patients you wouldn’t have seen otherwise as well as utilizing more doctors. Life at a larger practiced is more varied. In a big practice, physicians might spend time pursuing special interests or research. Options for part-time work are more available at a larger practice where responsibilities aren’t piled on between one or two physicians. The larger practice setting can also provide economic benefits for the physician.
2) Updating Technology
Utilizing EMR systems and updating software regularly will help with patient flow and wait times. The more organized the practice is, especially a larger office, the more patients can be seen. Implementing new technology can be stressful but if you are dedicated to growing the practice you and your staff must be able to adapt. Practices that are most successful are the most adaptable to change.
3) Adding Ancillary Services
Are you commonly outsourcing an ancillary service that fits with your current and potential patient population? Integrating services needed by your inbound and outbound referrals provides you with a patient-centered continuum of care with the goal of improving continuity of care, compliance and outcomes.
4) Broaden the Types of Specialists in the Practice
Thinking outside the box will help the practice achieve success. Giving patients the option of alternative treatment plans is becoming more popular as patients have greater access to knowledge about treatment options from online resources.
Whatever route you choose to scale up your practice, remember it is important to know that these changes take time. Whether you plan to add more physician, satellite offices or ancillary services each step to grow the practice will ultimately make your practice stronger and more profitable for the future.

Physician Reputation Management

Physicians have the responsibility to keep track of their online reputation. More so now than ever patients are using websites to get a better feel for a practice prior to making an appointment. Most physicians may not take the time to see what types of reviews patients are giving them and this could be detrimental, especially if the negative remarks outweigh the positive ones. Technology makes it easy for patients to go online and write a review about their experience, they can even write reviews within minutes of leaving the office, which makes the remarks difficult to control. Online reputation management should be a key component in your practice�s business plan.

Physicians should be proactive about their online presence and assign a person in the office who will keep track of social media. Even if some physicians are not online their names, complaints or compliments about them probably are. Create a website for your practice that is user friendly; give patients access to what your practice offers as well as bios on the physicians, PA�S and NP�S you employ. Keep the bios current and make changes if and when a person leaves the practice. Patients will appreciate your updates and it shows that you take an interest in your practice and more importantly you take an interest in how your patients view your practice.

Consistency is imperative when talking about online reputation management. Your reputation lives in two places: online and in-person; pay attention to both. Keep a sign in the waiting room saying you value patient feedback and give them an email address or phone number where they can give comments about the visit. If a patient has a visit that they feel was rushed or just satisfactory then supply him/her with a response and explains how their visits going forward will be improved. Patients might think that the wait time is too long or they may feel like physicians are rushing and you may not be aware of this because you think that everything is going smoothly when it is not. If patients feel comfortable enough telling you or another member of your staff how the appointment went, then they may not feel the need to write about it on other websites.

Physicians know that their reputation is a significant factor in determining patient volume and satisfaction and therefore they need to manage their online reputation. By keeping track of what is being written about the practice you will be able to increase patient satisfaction and decrease the likelihood of negative comments impacting your practice.

5 Things to Consider When a Surgeon Leaves Your Practice

High turnover is detrimental to your practice and learning that a surgeon wants to leave your practice will only cause you added stress and decreased morale. Recruiting for a surgeon, who is an integral part of your healthcare team, can be an overwhelming task. Depending on your practices’ size, and without a designated recruiter on board, you may find yourself struggling to find a replacement. When a surgeon is looking to leave your practice there are steps you need to take in order to better understand why the surgeon is leaving. Here are five tips you can use as a guide:

Conduct an exit interview: As an employer you conduct initial interviews when hiring a candidate as well as annual or bi-annual reviews after the employee has been hired. However, an extensive exit interview is essential and can be important in your practice’s success. The reason for conducting exit interviews is to get feedback position the surgeon held, the work environment, and the organization. A surgeon will almost always offer some reason for leaving upfront to avoid further discussion. Some reasons may be negotiable like wanting an increased salary, but only consider it if your budget allows it and if the employee is well worth it. Other reasons may highlight changes that need to be made in the practice like a negative work culture or decreased workflow to name a few. Evaluating these reasons can help spot problem areas you may need to work on. But it is your main task as the employer to avoid making the employee feel defensive and inadequate. You should ask questions that open a dialogue; concentrate on the practice as a whole rather than the employee. For example do not ask questions like, “What do you think is wrong with the position you held?” or “Why weren’t you able to handle the responsibilities of the position?” Instead, ask the following questions, “How can we make this job more rewarding for the next employee that we bring on board to work with us?” It is essential to ask for the employee’s assistance in critiquing his or her job description and the tasks required for the position. During the exit interview ask the surgeon what he or she thinks is the practice’s greatest strengths and weaknesses are. You may ask questions similar to this when conducting a reference check on an employee so make sure you hold yourself to the same standards. These questions may give you insight into changes that need to be made in order to operate as a successful practice.

Ask your staff for feedback: It is important not only to ask the departing surgeon but also the remaining staff at your practice for their feedback regarding job responsibilities. Ask your employees what skills and experience is needed for a new surgeon to be successful. Feedback helps improve job performance while promoting professional and personal development in employees. Providing feedback can improve employee morale and decrease confusion regarding expectations and present performance. Think of feedback as guidance that will assist you in allowing your employees and future employees to learn as well as to improve the quality of his or her work. Having weekly meetings with your staff will also help get a feel about the practice’s culture and then you can see what candidates will fit best in your practice. Furthermore, ask your staff what they value most about working at your practice; you can use this information when interviewing new candidates. Potential surgeons will sell themselves to you on what your practice is gaining by hiring them; conversely, you must be able to make a surgeon want to work for your practice.

Create a new job description: If a surgeon has been working with you for a long period of time most likely the surgeon’s job description is outdated regarding experience, skills and certifications. Healthcare is ever-changing and the requirements for physicians and surgeons change periodically. Refer to the other surgeons at your practice to get clearly defined job requirements and responsibilities to help you with your search for a new surgeon. Creating a new job description will help you articulate the most important qualities you need from a candidate. The job description is a communication tool allowing the candidate to know the role and responsibilities of the job. Also, it is important provide accurate information on the following: work schedules, compensation structure, benefits, vacation time, CME allowance, etc., as well as information regarding an opportunity for partnership for the candidates that you will be interviewing in the near future.

Create a new compensation structure: Surgeons don’t generally stay at the same salary for years on end; they expect raises and monetary rewards for a job well-done. Analyze the surgeons’ salaries and job performance yearly. You may find that some surgeons are bringing in a lot of money for your practice while others are not. Do some research and make sure the compensation you are offering is competitive in the present job market. You can use resources to help guide you in figuring out a reasonable salary such as the Medical Group Management Association (MGMA), the American Medical Association (AMA), and the American Medical Group Association (AMGA). With these organizations you can select geographic locations, specialty, and years of experience to assist you in having more knowledge about the standard compensation levels in your area. It is important to stay competitive with compensation to attract the greatest talent to your practice.

Create a search plan: Now that you have created a new job description and have a competitive salary in place the next step is finding candidates to interview. A qualified healthcare recruitment company can help set up interviews and conduct job searches. Recruitment is time consuming and if you or your employees conduct the search you are most likely taking people away from their responsibilities to focus on sifting through resumes and scheduling interviews. It can be very costly to advertise on job boards as well. When hiring a recruiting agency keep a timeline that will help you stay on track of your staffing needs. Recruiting agencies such as SpineSearch are professionals in the healthcare staffing field. Recruitment agencies are able to commit 100% of their workday to advertise and recruit. They are able to identify the utmost qualified surgeons and find one who will best fit your practice. They handle all of the advertising and conduct reference and background checks allowing you additional time to focus on the day to day operations of your practice.

How to Manage Physician Staff Performance

Effectively managing clinical staff, for a medical practice, takes a lot of work and can be stressful at times. However, taking the proper steps to manage physicians and medical staff will boost revenue and decrease your turn-over rate. There are six steps that every practice should employ in order to create a productive and stress free work environment:

1) Shared GoalsPhysicians and staff should all share the same goal which is providing quality care for all patients. This is an overall goal for your practice as well as an individual goal for each physician and member of the nonclinical staff. In order to create shared goals amongst doctors and staff, there has to be guidelines and mission statement for staff. Creating a specific office culture that encourages growth and hard work will ultimately benefit how your practice operates. Connect with members of the staff during meetings in order to form cohesive goals that will have measurable outcomes.

2) Clearly Defined Roles
For any practice to function, and function well, roles need be to be clearly defined prior to an employees’ start date. A lot of the issues that arise between healthcare professionals have to do with confusion about job responsibilities. However, cross-training staff to learn your current EMR system may be a good idea; if someone is out sick then you won’t have to worry about jobs not getting done. It’s easy to say that doctors treat the patients and the staff controls the filing and scheduling, that’s true, but there is a lot more to the daily operations than just patient flow. When hiring an employee there needs to be a clear set of job skills and responsibilities that need to be met not just so they can understand their role, but the employer can organize daily operations of the practice better.

3) Effective CommunicationCommunicating effectively may seem like the easiest part about managing clinical staff, this is not the case; you’d be surprised to hear that many practices flounder because of poor communication. Communication needs to start with the practice manager and trickle down from there. If the practice manager does not communicate well with staff, then other aspects of the practice will suffer; revenue might decrease and the turnover rate will be high. Employees do not want to work in a setting where they are not given proper direction; the environment becomes chaotic and no practice can afford that.

4) Physician Productivity
How the physician is able to conduct his/her work on a daily basis greatly affects the entire staff. Dividing tasks into two categories: clinical and non-clinical, so the physician isn’t doing tasks that take away from seeing patients. Reducing unnecessary inbound calls and interruptions by nurses will help give the physician more structure throughout the day and maximize the amount of face-to-face time with patients.

5) Evaluation
Evaluating medical staff regularly and consistently can help you stay on top of staff performance. From the start of employment, a physician should know about your evaluation system and that they will be evaluated on regular basis. This will help doctors and nonclinical staff know that you will be evaluating them in order to better their job performance and better the practice overall. If you notice an employee is underperforming, there should be a set time limit for improvements. Documenting problems with a staff member will help you in the long term in case termination is necessary.

6) Mutual Respect
Holding weekly staff meeting will help develop respect between clinical and nonclinical staff. Meetings are a good way to keep in touch and stay on top of things. This does not mean your staff should feel like they are being micromanaged. Giving your staff enough room to excel at their jobs while staying on track of their performance will have a positive effect on your office culture.

In-Demand Healthcare Occupations

Healthcare occupations are projected to grow exponentially over the next ten years. The healthcare field is expected to produce 3.2 million jobs from 2010-2020. That’s faster than the average growth for any other occupation. We wanted to give you a look at the top healthcare jobs that are projected to grow rapidly.  Here are some of jobs that are most in-demand:

Registered Nurse

Nurses are the most in demand when it comes to healthcare jobs. There will be a 48% growth by the year 2020 for nursing jobs, and over 580,000 new jobs created by 2020. Nurses take on more responsibility in the treatment of patients which is a cost saving measure; thus creating a demand. The median salary for a nurse is $64,690 with the opportunity for growth.

Medical Assistant

Medical Assistants are projected to grow 34% by 2020. Job opportunities should be abundant for MA’s with formal training.  Medical Assistants complete administrative and clinical tasks in the offices of physicians and other healthcare professionals. The median salary is $28,860.

Home Health Aide

Home Health Aide jobs are projected to grow 50% by 2020. A Home Health Aide is responsible to provide basic care for people with disabilities, chronic illness, and cognitive impairments. They help elderly, disabled and ill persons living in their own homes. The average salary for a Home Health Aide is about $24,000.

Physical Therapists

Physical Therapist jobs are projected to grow 30% by 2020. PT’s provide services to help restore function improve mobility, relieve pain and prevent or limit permanent physical disabilities. A Master’s degree and state license is required to become a Physical Therapist.  The median salary ranges from $65,000-$85,000.

Physician’s Assistant

Physician’s Assistants are projected to grow 39% through 2018. Physician’s Assistants work directly under a doctor’s supervision and experience working with a team while having autonomy. The starting salary ranges from $70,000-$90,000.

Management Tips for Physician Practice Owners

Practice management is the most significant aspect of a well-organized office. The recruiters at SpineSearch know how important it is for a practice to have great management in order to retain employees. This week we will focus on steps you need to take towards effective practice management.

In order to manage your practice well, you have to establish a well drafted manual of policies your employees will follow. Use probationary periods and have a formal hiring process. If you have a system for hiring, you are less likely to hire employees that will not meet the criteria you are looking for. These tasks may seem difficult but there are huge benefits in establishing an office that runs efficiently.

Set up a meeting for your staff and show both new and experienced employees the new policies. Make sure everyone is on board and understands why you are enforcing these policies. Your goal is to create an office environment that is both positive and structured. Your employees need to feel like they are being heard just as much as you need to feel like you are in charge.

Aim for a healthy sense of control; you know what your employees are up to and they feel like they can come to you with any issues or concerns they have about their jobs. Communication goes a long way in an office setting; you can retain employees better if you establish a good working relationship with them.

Practice management can feel like a daunting task, but if you start out with a clear set of standards before you hire your next employee you will see a huge improvement in the overall flow of your office.

Here are four steps to remember:

1) Empower and Inform: Practice owners should monitor employees in a constructive way.
2) Talk and Listen to People: Spend one-on-one time with employees. The more you know about your practice, the better it will function.
3) Let People Work at their Highest Purpose: Give positive reinforcement. Encourage your employees to take on more responsibilities at work.
4) Follow up and Be Consistent: Set specific goals and timelines, have weekly meetings to catch up with what everyone is working on.

Compensate for Talent with Effort: New Graduates

As a new grad you probably feel like you’re outnumbered by candidates who have experience. SpineSearch wants to help you see that making an effort for a new job will impress the employer you are interviewing with. Employers usually want people with some experience, but as a new grad you have your schooling, clinical rotations, and internships to fall back on. Don’t let the employer underestimate you.

Enthusiasm will be your biggest and best advantage over other applicants. You want to show the employer that you chose this profession for a reason—you love it. Showing that you care and how excited you are to work in this field will make an employer think twice before counting you out.
You want to be as prepared as possible for your interview; research the practice or hospital you are looking to apply to, what they specialize in, and if they are right for your line of work.

Sending a “Thank You” card or email (which is much more common these days) goes a long way when interviewing right out of college. The employer appreciates it and will set you apart from candidates who didn’t go the extra mile. The thank you can also act as a follow-up and remind the employer who you are and they will be much more likely to get back to you with a yes or no sooner rather than later.

Compensating for your lack of experience with effort will go much further than an experienced candidate who has become apathetic about the field. If you show up and want to be there, you will learn volumes and be ahead of the pack before you know it.

Emotional Needs in the Workplace

Am I happy with my job? People ask themselves this all the time without putting too much stock into whether the answer is yes or no. However, if you are unhappy with your job this can affect job performance and overall self-esteem, and decrease your productivity at work. This week we’re focusing on how emotional needs have to be met in the workplace in order to create a positive work environment.

Emotional needs in the workplace are very important in contributing to an overall healthy work environment. If you feel like no one cares about you at work, then you are more likely not to work as hard or dread going to work.

Feeling like you belong at your job and with your coworkers goes a long way when furthering your career; motivation is everything. When you feel like you belong and that people understand and listen to you, you’re much more likely to be successful at work. Team building at work can help fulfill the sense of belonging and also relieve stress. When a person feels like they cannot turn to anyone at work they become unhappy in the workplace.

Being given more responsibilities at work helps create great self-worth. When your boss gives you more tasks and responsibility it shows how valuable you are to the team. You should always be looking for opportunities to grow within your field and gain more knowledge about your industry. It is important to gain recognition for a job well-done. If you do not get the credit for your hard work you will not feel valuable.
Happiness at work is an important factor for employees everywhere. Finding a field you love and wanting to further your career will give you lasting success. SpineSearch can help you find a job that makes you happy and successful!
Contact SpineSearch Today!

SpineSearch LLC Awarded Physician Recruiting Agreement with the Premier Healthcare Alliance

SpineSearch LLC Awarded Physician Recruiting Agreement with the Premier Healthcare Alliance
Dateline February 01, 2012 SpineSearch LLC announced today that it has been awarded a 18-month group purchasing agreement with the Premier healthcare alliance, for its Physician Recruiting. February 01, the new agreement allows Premier members, at their discretion, to take advantage of special pricing and terms pre-negotiated by Premier for Physician Recruiting.

“SpineSearch LLC is honored to have the opportunity to work with one of the finest GPOs, Premier, and its members on Physician Staffing,” said SpineSearch LLC CEO & Founder Nicola Hawkinson. This will allow Premier and SpineSearch to better serve the healthcare providers throughout the United States

SpineSearch will be offering Premier alliance members the ability to tap into our network of Physicians. SpineSearch’s ability to place qualified candidates to specific institutions comes from the clinical backgrounds and qualifications of the SpineSearch team, along with a substantial database of prescreened candidates. CEO and Founder, Nicola Hawkinson, uses her clinical background to expertly find and place candidates for potential employers. SpineSearch has a database filled with thousands of applicants that have pre-screening interviews with a member of the SpineSearch team, and continue on to potential employers. This selection process is what differentiates SpineSearch from other recruitment agencies. Premier members will have the means to pick Physicians that are competent leaders in their field in a seamless process without the worries of negotiating terms and or pricing because of their relationship with Premier.

About the Premier healthcare alliance, Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award recipient
Premier is a performance improvement alliance of more than 2,500 U.S. hospitals and 81,000-plus other healthcare sites using the power of collaboration to lead the transformation to high quality, cost-effective care. Owned by hospitals, health systems and other providers, Premier maintains the nation’s most comprehensive repository of clinical, financial and outcomes information and operates a leading healthcare purchasing network. A world leader in helping deliver measurable improvements in care, Premier has worked with the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services and the United Kingdom’s National Health Service North West to improve hospital performance. Headquartered in Charlotte, N.C., Premier also has an office in Washington. http://www.premierinc.com. Stay connected with Premier on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.

About Supplier SpineSearch LLC
The SpineSearch mission is steadfast in providing a superior network between highly qualified healthcare professionals, medical specialists, and healthcare facilities. Our vision is to provide a cutting edge network within the medical field and its professionals. We are focused exclusively to the healthcare field and offer a unique level of expertise in the industry. SpineSearch is led by experts in the industry who are knowledgeable about every dimension of the field. We invoke a commitment to those employed in the industry, offering continued education and career building symposiums, focusing on job satisfaction and decreased turnover. A community network of medical professionals dedicated to the future of healthcare. SpineSearch is certified as a women’s business enterprise through the Women’s Business Enterprise National Council (WBENC), the nation’s largest third party certifier of businesses owned and operated by women in the US. We recognize the commitment to supplier diversity that is embraced by corporations and government agencies today, and we can add diversity to your supply chain. http://www.spine-search.com/ Stay in touch with SpineSearch LLC on FaceBook, Twitter and .. Linkedin

New York Society of Interventional Pain Physicians Conference

SpineSearch attended last week’s New York Society of Interventional Pain Physicians conference at the beautiful Hyatt on the Hudson in Jersey City. Thanks to all who stopped by our booth to learn about SpineSearch. We made several connections with physicians based in New York and New Jersey who are looking to add staff to their practices. New job openings will be coming soon for Physiatrists, Family Medicine, Nurse Practitioners and Physician Assistants. Further, we met with several Anesthesiologist/Pain Fellows who will be seeking opportunities in the New Jersey/New York areas upon completion of fellowship this summer. We found the meeting to be very engaging and productive. Big thanks to Paul Ellis from Kimberly Clark Healthcare for making several great introductions, and the staff from Dr. Chapman’s office for all of their assistance. We look forward to attending next year’s meeting!