Recruitment and Staffing

We are expert in matching employees and employers to build a productive, efficient practice or department. Our unexcelled experience and connections within the world of spine mean that we may know your ideal candidate is ready to move on befire they realize it themselves. Experience the difference that it makes when your search partner is founded by recognized medical professionals.

The Jobs We Fill

Frontline Physician

The attending physician is an individual who independently responsible for the assessment, diagnosis and treatment of patients. The ideal physician will elude attentiveness, knowledge, and patience. Patients must be informed, have their interested represented, and feel respected by their attending physician. Thorough assessment and treatment are necessary in order to practice safely. Although the MD may practice independently, it is essential for the MD to be able to work as an inter-disciplinary team member with staff and other collaborating physicians.

Neurosurgeon

A neurosurgeon is a physician who specializes in the diagnosis and surgical treatment of disorders of the central and peripheral nervous system including congenital anomalies, trauma, tumors, vascular disorders, infections of the brain or spine, stroke, or degenerative diseases of the spine. The education and training to become a neurosurgeon is rigorous and extensive and includes the completion of:

  • Four years of pre-medical education at a college or university
  • Four years of medical school resulting in an M.D. or D.O. degree
  • One year internship in general surgery
  • Five to seven years in a neurosurgery residency program
  • Some neurosurgeons complete a fellowship after residency to specialize in a particular area
  • Continuing education - annual meetings, conferences, scientific journals, research - to keep up with advances made in the complex field of neurosurgery

Spine Surgeon

Spine Surgeons are professionals who have attended medical school and passed the required licensing exam. Spine Surgeon’s residency program is a 5-year commitment that prepares individuals to work in the field. The program offers doctors an opportunity to complete surgical rotations in areas such as general surgery, surgical ICU, internal medicine and the emergency room. Additionally, further rotations are offered in surgical subspecialties, such as cardiovascular and orthopedic surgery. The American Board of Orthopedic Surgery offers specialty certifications for spine surgeons. In order to earn certification, spine surgeons need to have experience in the specialty, obtain an endorsement and pass a written exam.

Neurologist

Neurologists treat patients with complex disorders of the nervous system such as stroke, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, Lou Gehrig's disease, epilepsy, headache disorders, infections of the brain and peripheral nervous system. Neurologists often work closely with neurosurgeons, but do not perform surgery.

Physiatrist

Physiatrists are nerve, muscle, and bone experts who treat injuries or illnesses that affect how you move. Rehabilitation physicians are medical doctors who have completed training in the medical specialty of physical medicine and rehabilitation (PM&R). Physiatrists:

  • Diagnose and treat pain
  • Restore maximum function lost through injury, illness or disabling conditions
  • Treat the whole person, not just the problem area
  • Lead a team of medical professionals
  • Provide non-surgical treatments
  • Explain your medical problems and treatment/prevention

Registered Nurse First Assist (RNFA)

The Registered Nurse First Assist (RNFA) is a Registered Nurse with specialized operating room and assisting training. Most often, the qualifications for a RNFA include a current RN license, national certification in peri-operative nursing (CNOR), and the completion of a nurse first assistant educational program approved by AORN.

Acceptance into the RNFA course requires the following: RN license in the state of practice, CNOR with 2 years peri-operative experience, proficiency in scrub and circulating role, basic knowledge of anatomy and physiology, and BCLS/ACLS certification.

The RNFA's role encompasses the entire perioperative experience. The RNFA may be involved in the preoperative patient evaluation, assisting the surgeon intraoperatively, and carie of the patient in the early postoperative/recovery phase. This comprehensive involvement aids to improve operating room efficiency and patient safety in an effort to improve outcomes.

Physician Assistant

A Physician assistant (PA) is an individual who has successfully completed a Physician Assistant program and is licensed by the state (or states) to practice as a PA. Many applicants have Bachelor's or Master's degrees. Medical schools, colleges, community colleges, and teaching hospitals offer PA programs, which combine classroom and clinical study. The duration of study is approximately two years.

Physician assistants can take medical histories, examine and treat patients, order and interpret laboratory tests and imaging studies, treat minor injuries, instruct and counsel patients, and order various treatment modalities. In most states, PAs can also prescribe medications. Many states require certification and registration with the state medical board.

Physician assistants, who work only under the supervision of doctors, are employed in hospitals, clinics, and private offices. Two years of college and health care experience are common requirements for admission to physician assistant training programs..

Registered Nurse

A Registered Nurse is an individual who has graduated from either a diploma, associate or bachelorette program in Nursing and is licensed within a particular state (or states) to practice nursing. The responsibilities of a Registered Nurse include: health promotion, disease prevention, patient education, direct patient care, medication administration, and liaison between patient and physician.

Responsibilities depend on the setting in which the Registered Nurse is practicing. Nurses may specialize in a field of medicine such as spine. The duties of a nurse depend on the type of nursing career they choose.

Nurse Practitioner

A Nurse Practitioner is a Registered Nurse with a Master's degree and has completed the necessary state requirements to practice as a Nurse Practitioner. A Nurse Practitioner can have specialized training within a specialty such as: Acute Care Nursing, Adult Nursing, Community Health Nursing, Family Nursing, Geriatric Nursing, Home Health Nursing, Neonatal Nursing, Occupational Health Nursing, Oncology Nursing, Pediatric Nursing, Psychiatric Nursing, Rural Nursing, and Women's Health Nursing.

NPs provide general medical care and treatment to patients in medical facilities, such as clinics, health centers, or public health agencies both independently and in collaboration with a physician (depending of state law). They perform physical examinations and preventive health measures. NPs are licensed to assess diagnose and treat patients. They have the ability to order and interpret diagnostic and laboratory tests. NPs work collaboratively with physicians and other interdisciplinary member of the health care team to create and execute a comprehensive patient care plan. NPs are licensed to prescribe and dispense medications (the type of medications may vary by state law) . NPs may refer patients to physician for consultation or to specialized health resources for treatment and, where state law permits, may engage in independent practice.

Physician Assistant

A Physician assistant (PA) is an individual who has successfully completed a Physician Assistant program and is licensed by the state (or states) to practice as a PA. Many applicants have Bachelor's or Master's degrees. Medical schools, colleges, community colleges, and teaching hospitals offer PA programs, which combine classroom and clinical study. The duration of study is approximately two years.

Physician assistants can take medical histories, examine and treat patients, order and interpret laboratory tests and imaging studies, treat minor injuries, instruct and counsel patients, and order various treatment modalities. In most states, PAs can also prescribe medications. Many states require certification and registration with the state medical board.

Physician assistants, who work only under the supervision of doctors, are employed in hospitals, clinics, and private offices. Two years of college and health care experience are common requirements for admission to physician assistant training programs.

Surgery Tech

A surgical technologist is an invaluable member of the operating room. The daily duties of a surgical technologist include: instrumentation sterilization, equipment management, patient safety, and assisting the surgeon with instrumentation during the surgical procedure.

Before surgery, the surgical technologist is responsible for preparing both the surgical room and the patient for surgery. They also assemble equipment that will be used during surgery, check for malfunctions and make any needed adjustments. The surgical tech prepares the patient by clensing, shaving (if necessary), and sterilizing the site of the surgery. They are also involved in patient transfer and positioning both pre and post-operatively.

During surgery, surgical technologists hand instruments and other supplies to the surgeon, as well as help the surgeon into fresh gowns and gloves. They may be asked to assist the surgeon in suturing wounds, applying dressing, handling tissue, or cutting stitches. Specimens taken from the patient for later study will be cared for by the surgical technologist.

After the operation is complete, the surgical technologist transports the patient to recovery and cleans the operating room in preparation for the next case.

Intraoperative Neuromonitoring Technologist

Intraoperative neuromonitoring or IONM technologists work alongside anesthesiologists and surgeons in operating rooms, monitoring brain signals and testing the nervous system to reduce or avoid complications. They use technologies such as electromyography, somatosensory-evoked potentials, and electroencephalography, etc.

Patients benefit from neuromonitoring during certain surgical procedures- especially surgery where there is risk to the nervous system. Most neuromonitoring is utilized by spine surgeons or neurosurgeons, but vascular, orthopedic, otolaryngologists and urology surgeons also have a need for neuromonitoring technicians as well. IOMN technologists are able to perform monitoring functions that promote the smooth flow of the surgical procedure and positive patient outcomes.

In the US, IONM licensure has not been legislated at the state or federal level. Although most facilities do require licensure and certification as well as internal regulations that effect staffing IOMNs. There are at least two private certifications available: CNIM (Certified in Neurophysiological Intraoperative Monitoring) and D.ABNM (Diplomat of the American Board of Neurophysiological Monitoring).

Practice Administrator

Personnel, financial and many other related matters in a medical facility need a great amount of attention and careful handling which is undertaken by this position. The business end of a medical practice requires management, carried out by a Practice Administrator.

A Practice Administrator is responsible for hiring, training, supervising, retention and evaluation of all levels of administrative staff. Preparing bank deposits, developing reports of income and expenditure and ensuring that the medical facility has its accounts running smoothly are all parts of the Practice Administrator's job.

A Practice Administrator has a wide range of responsibilities, from ensuring that the janitorial and maintenance staff is keeping the medical facility clean and well maintained, to carrying out different software application processes, such as spreadsheets and emails when required.

Overseeing the purchasing section of the medical facility requires a Practice Administrator to keep track of the items that need to be purchased regularly, and determining whether the supply has been furnished.

Common attributes of Practice Administrator include:

Great oral and communication skills -- Great leadership and developmental qualities -- Good organizational skills -- Ability to deal with different types of software applications

Bachelor's degree in health administration or business along with adequate knowledge in medical practices and equipment. Advanced degrees and certifications are a big plus

Five to ten years experience in related field is an added advantage.

Medical Office Manager

Medical office managers oversee the business operations of a medical practice. In a group practice, the office manager supervises the work of other administrative staff, such as the medical receptionist, medical records technician, and biller. In smaller offices, they may handle all or most of the administrative duties.

Managing a medical office includes a wide range of responsibilities, such as hiring and training staff, working with vendors who sell equipment and supplies, contracting for cleaning services and the removal of medical waste, ensuring compliance with various regulatory agencies, and renewing any licenses required for the personnel and office. Much of the attention on the office manager is directed towards ensuring compliance.

Medical Biller

Medical billing professionals focus on the financial and business side of healthcare. Medical billing specialists responsibilities include: receiving and processing payments, maintaining and managing of all patient insurance information and claims, collecting payment and follow up all all past-due payments and denied claims.

The principal duty of a medical billing specialist is to collect payment for medical services rendered. This can be a complicated and involved task as medical billing is regulated and influenced by insurance companies, Medicare and Medicaid providers, and various other legal guidelines.

Medical billing specialists must have an in-depth knowledge of insurance claims processing, Medicare and Medicaid rules, patient privacy law and rights, Social Security disability rules, debt collection law, and medical terminology & coding.

Medical Receptionist

The Medical Receptionist is the face of the office. This will very often be a patient's first contact with a practice. Responsibilities of a receptionist include but are not limited to answering the phone, appointment scheduling, recording messages, organizing the practice calendar, and transferring relevant information to other practices. The Medical Receptionist maintains patient's health and financial information and serves as liaison between physician and patient to provide optimal patient care.